The Desk

October 31, 2018

Worth a Read – September (Part 3)

A Wealth of Resources

A Wealth of Resources

Ahem. Yes, this is supposed to be the September-October issue of (new name) Worth a Read. But it’s still October! At any rate, the content that is worth your attention for entertainment, education, and current trends is here. A feeble attempt will be made this time around to create content in categories (no promises because I might stray). Rather than overwhelm you with a new form of a Mitchner novel, this will be a three-volume issue. Find Part 1 and Part 2 in these locations.

Something to Recommend?

You can be part of the creation of this list. All that’s needed is you post your suggestion to In a Word – CCJP for literature or post business-related recommendations to Entrances – Recruit and Retain with the title of the article, author, a brief summary of why it’s noteworthy, a link to the item, and the hashtag “WorthaRead”.

Literature

  • Jessica Miller-Merrell is the CIO at Workology, an HR network. She recently offered a copy of Barney Feinberg’s book, The Chemistry Factor: Create Powerful Business Relationships for Greater Success, to a limited number of HR pros, writers, and bloggers. I just read the summary of the book and Feinberg’s background. For those who are in the OD space (or simply in business development in some way), this is definitely something you need to read and have on your bookshelf. Perhaps you can compare Feinberg’s recommendations to your current practices to determine where you want (or need) to make adjustments.
  • Something tells me Laura Morelli is just the slightest bit elated about the acclaim her 4.5-star historical novel, The Painter’s Apprentice: A Novel of 16th-Century Venice, earned from Writer’s Digest.
  • Geoff Boxell gives the latest novel in the Master of War series, Scourge of Wolves (Master of War Book 5), by David Gilman, 4 stars and says:

    . . . I re-enact a 14thC English archer, though one of a different temperament to Sir Thomas Blackstone. Because of this I have read all of the previous books in the Master of War series and even corresponded with the author, David Gilman.

    Talk to those who have been to war and they will tell you that it is 90% boredom, 9% excitement and 1% sheer terror, or something like that. Thus book reverses the ratio and it is 90% excitement and sheer terror, mostly for those who oppose Sir Thomas.

  • Sandra Gulland rates The Lost History of Dreams
    by Kris Waldherr a 5 star historical read. See the summary on GoodReads.

Business

  • Fahad Aslam Khokhar and Audrey Eisner-Hoeller have more than praise for for Malcolm Gladwell’s Tipping Point. In fact, one of them refers to him as a thought leader while the other recommends you put his book on your library shelf (after you’ve read it). Says Fahad:

    For all those who feel that success is a stroke of luck for many, this book is worth a read. There are always some convincing reasons to explain why some business spread like a social epidemic called the Tipping Point.

Professional Development

White Papers

  • When it comes to careful selection of Board members, there are certain characteristics that are red flags. (National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD) offers a complimentary copy of an article that provides guidance on screening and selecting directors. A Field Guide to Bad Directors, NACD Directorship (July/August 2018)
    Something of a primer for screening and selection of Board members. From “How to identify them. How not to become one” by Michael Pocalyko

Articles

  • California Just Became the First State to Require Women on Corporate Boards. Here’s What You Need to Know, Sophia Bollag/Associated Press, Money (October 1, 2018)
    What does your board of directors look like? Brown has taken steps to address the long-held knowledge that boards that include women are more profitable and future focused.

  • How to Prevent Discrimination in the Workplace, Michael Arnold, Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, PC, XPert HR (a LexisNexis partner)
    Most employers are well aware that they must and should prevent discrimination in the workplace. Indeed, failing to curb discrimination can be costly and result in increased employee turnover and absenteeism, lower employee morale and productivity, and higher insurance premiums and defense costs, among other things. Therefore, it is important for employers to be proactive and prevent discrimination from occurring in the first place. To accomplish this goal, employers should consider the following steps. . .

  • GM’s Commitment to People With Disabilities, Diversity, Inc.
    Providing solid reasoning for the inclusion factor when it comes to workers (and their families) with disabilities.

  • Lawsuit-proof your company: 20 tips from HR peers, The HR Specialist, Business Management Daily (May 25, 2016)
    Best practices advice

  • Words of HR Wisdom: 33 Great Hiring Tips From Your Peers, Patrick DiDomenico, Business Management Daily (October 15, 2013)
    Screening and interviewing: Two of the most important factors in creating a thriving and productive workplace. Advice relevant to not only managers and employers but also to job seekers.

Videos and Movies

Resources:

You May Also Like:

Worth a Read – September (Part 2)

A Wealth of Resources

A Wealth of Resources

Ahem. Yes, this is supposed to be the September-October issue of (new name) Worth a Read. But it’s still October! At any rate, the content that is worth your attention for entertainment, education, and current trends is here. A feeble attempt will be made this time around to create content in categories (no promises because I might stray). Rather than overwhelm you with a new form of a Mitchner novel, this will be a three-volume issue. Find Part 1 and Part 3 in these locations.

Something to Recommend?

You can be part of the creation of this list. All that’s needed is you post your suggestion to In a Word – CCJP for literature or post business-related recommendations to Entrances – Recruit and Retain with the title of the article, author, a brief summary of why it’s noteworthy, a link to the item, and the hashtag “WorthaRead”.

Literature

  • In August, Carolyn Hughes was staying in and doing a book tour chat with Linda Hill about A Woman’s Lot. If you’d like to know more about what to expect from a book tour, it’s well worth a visit to Linda’s visit with Carolyn.

    Says Linda in her review of the book:

    But what I truly hadn’t expected was that Linda would have time to read the book and leave a review! She’s a very busy lady and we only set up this “chat” a little while ago. But she did read A Woman’s Lot and she loved it! Stop by the blog and get in on the conversation. It’s worth a read.

    DO read her review at the end of the chat – it really is terrific, and I couldn’t be more delighted.

  • Those interested in even more about Egypt may want to explore co-author and editor Renée Friedman’s collection, Egypt and Nubia: Gifts of the Desert.
  • Beth Wilson shares a very moving review of Necessary Lies by Diane Chamberlain. She calls it one of the best books she’s read all year. With the mounting social tensions in the U.S., this real story of the dilemmas faced by a 1950s North Carolina social worker is bound to make you gnash your teeth.
  • So Middle Ages history is your cup of tea. Well, Alex Marchant has this recommendation about a Richard III novel that’s also great for a family style worth a read:
    “In the week in which the sad events of the Battle of Bosworth are remembered, I’m pleased to say the second book in my series telling the last years in the life of King Richard III has been reviewed in the Richard III Society Bulletin.” The same reviewer who called ‘The Order of the White Boar’ ‘a wonderful work of historical fiction for both children and adults’, says that ‘The King’s Man’ is:

    “full of action, adventure and determination to succeed … well researched, with lots of historical fact … beautifully suited to ‘children’ between 8 and 108 … The narrative unfolds swiftly and Marchant keeps the pace moving along, just as events at that time developed quickly … I look forward to the third book in the series…”
    Both books are available in ebook and paperback.

  • On my mind for quite some time are the McCarthy era, blacklisting, reputation management, and credibility. A recent Sunday news talk show featured Marvin Kalb during which he discussed his new book, Enemy of the People: Trump’s War on the Press, the New McCarthyism, and the Threat to American Democracy and I was inspired by his examination of the comparisons. Now a 5So Middle Ages history is your cup of tea. Well, Alex Marchant has this recommendation about a Richard III novel that’s also great for a family style worth a read:

    In the week in which the sad events of the Battle of Bosworth are remembered, I’m pleased to say the second book in my series telling the last years in the life of King Richard III has been reviewed in the Richard III Society Bulletin.

    The same reviewer who called The Order of the White Boar “a wonderful work of historical fiction for both children and adults,” says that The King’s Man is:

    full of action, adventure and determination to succeed … well researched, with lots of historical fact … beautifully suited to ‘children’ between 8 and 108 … The narrative unfolds swiftly and Marchant keeps the pace moving along, just as events at that time developed quickly … I look forward to the third book in the series…

    Both books are available in ebook and paperback-star rated title on GoodReads.

Business

  • Arshya Vahabzadeh M.D.
    Chief Medical Officer, Brain Power. Clinical Psychiatrist, AI & AR Technology for Behavioral and Mental Health shares his enthusiasm about a new book on technology.

    Excited to see Reuters cover the deployment of our Brain Power AI technology to Schools in Massachusetts. Direct educator and student feedback has been very positive, and our research & development program is growing at an incredible pace. We are hiring for over a dozen positions, check our website for more details.

Professional Development

White Papers

  • When it comes to careful selection of Board members, there are certain characteristics that are red flags. (National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD) offers a complimentary copy of an article that provides guidance on screening and selecting directors. A Field Guide to Bad Directors, NACD Directorship (July/August 2018)
    Something of a primer for screening and selection of Board members. From “How to identify them. How not to become one” by Michael Pocalyko

Articles

Videos and Movies

  • Diana Y. Paul grabs historical fiction authors’ and readers’ attention with her recommendation of a Spike Lee movie and read. The conversation comes from many parts of our U.S. population who have awareness of the KKK’s beginnings and purpose as well as how it has evolved into what it now represents. Get your teeth into BlacKkKlansman.

    As a supplement, Diana also recommend this item about the KKK from History.com, Ku Klux Klan.

  • These Famous American Companies Were All Founded By Immigrants, IJR Blue Presents
    What I’m getting from this is that immigrants are good for business (opening jobs and keeping people employed, nurturing creativity) and the economy. They do not pose a threat to the public welfare but instead pose a benefit to it in many ways.

  • Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Has Bold Ideas to Fix Our Health Care System, IJR Blue Presents
    Some things you need to know for the upcoming mid-term election.hat

Resources:

You May Also Like:

Worth a Read – September (Part 1)

A Wealth of Resources

A Wealth of Resources

Ahem. Yes, this is supposed to be the September-October issue of (new name) Worth a Read. But it’s still October! At any rate, the content that is worth your attention for entertainment, education, and current trends is here. A feeble attempt will be made this time around to create content in categories (no promises because I might stray). Rather than overwhelm you with a new form of a Mitchner novel, this will be a three-volume issue. Find Part 2 and Part 3 in these locations.

Something to Recommend?

You can be part of the creation of this list. All that’s needed is you post your suggestion to In a Word – CCJP for literature or post business-related recommendations to Entrances – Recruit and Retain with the title of the article, author, a brief summary of why it’s noteworthy, a link to the item, and the hashtag “WorthaRead”.

Literature

  • In August, Michael Smith had a special free download for any of his mystery thrillers. Available in a large number of formats, your in for a treat if you’re a fan of this genre. All Michael asks is, “If you download one of them for free during the free book promotion and enjoy reading it, then I’d like to ask you for a favor. Would you be kind enough to leave a review for the book on Amazon? It’d be greatly appreciated!”
    Find three of Michael Ace Smith titles, out of the seven, on Goodreads. Or go to Amazon for the full array.

  • What an opening Mary Deal has in her new ebook release, River Bones. If you’re into mysteries and suspense, it looks like this is a must have. It made Amazon’s Top 100.
  • There are those times when we have questions, hard questions. That’s when it’s time to have a conversation with an authority. A neighbor recommends a great starting point. I’m not certain of which of the three is on her shelf, but she highly recommends Conversations with God by Neale Donald Walsch.

    In case you want to dive into the full conversation author Walsch has compiled, there is also the The Complete Conversations with God: An Uncommon Dialogue (Conversations with God #1-3)
    Or you can just start with one and savor the epiphanies derived from each new reading. Either way, it’s “Worth a Read.”

  • So you’d expect that kings, ancient kings, kings and dignitaries of Egypt, would be given the utmost in treatment and respect, especially for their remains. However, Nupur Tustin tells us that isn’t necessarily the case when it comes to U.S. history. The story of Egypt Uncovered as told by Vivian Davies and Renée Friedman and via Amazon Prime is filled with shocking revelations.
  • AARP offered their “Fall Books Preview” on August 29. You just may find something that tickles your fancy among the titles.

Business

Professional Development

  • EasyTechGuides on YouTube
  • Soul on Ice
    In light of the Kavanaugh confirmation hearings and the revelations about his past,plus the sentencing of Bill Cosby, many recollections surface. In particular is Eldridge Cleaver’s _Soul on Ice_. It’s the only book I’ve ever attempted to read and by the end of Chapter 2 put it back on the shelf with a vow to never read anything from him. Get a copy of the book and learn why.

  • Marcia Bridges Merrill, Life Coach, Psychologist, author, and consultant has some titles that are helpful on many fronts. Explore the concepts and recommendations she makes in her any one, or all, of her books – The Perfect Network-Out, Balancing, Creating & Living Wealth + Wellness and Manifesting a New Life: Money, Love, Health and Everything in Between for starters. I recommend these titles not only for those involved in professions that involve understanding and appreciating the conditions of people who are being served but also for those who need to be served.

White Papers

  • When it comes to careful selection of Board members, there are certain characteristics that are red flags. (National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD) offers a complimentary copy of an article that provides guidance on screening and selecting directors. A Field Guide to Bad Directors, NACD Directorship (July/August 2018)
    Something of a primer for screening and selection of Board members. From “How to identify them. How not to become one” by Michael Pocalyko

Articles

Videos and Movies

  • There’s a debate about the statement Kapernick is making. The statement is called free speech. To punish him for his speech and essentially tell him he has no right to peacefully object is to plunge him into a modern version of slavery. The ills of this country do not begin and stop with the impact on the Negro ethnicity. It also historically impacts those who are of Chinese, Japanese, and Native American descent. And these days, it’s beginning to include those who are part of the Muslim community.
    What does our flag represent? What is patriotism?

  • It’s important when seeking a barometer for leadership role models and good ethical practices. Consider the Cuomo video that challenges the information we have about White House leadership and ethics. I believe the expert’s assessment that Cohen is looking for a “get out of jail free” card is very accurate. However, what I also am seeing is a replay of All the President’s Men.
  • When it comes to sexual harassment, it appears status also brings privilege along with the ability to intimidate. All we need do is look to our national leader (our poster child) for an example. But here we have the leader of one of the leading news stations facing the disclosure.
  • A new series is coming to us via Netflix called Rise of the Phoenixes (find video). Rather unique as far as Western entertainment is concerned, this series, as Erica McDonald tells us, is set in ancient China. Time for discovery and enlightenment.

    Perhaps this is the story in book form The legend of Fuyao by Tian Xia Gui Yuan. Not only worth viewing for those who want to know and understand Chinese history and culture, also “Worth a Read.”

Resources:

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September 10, 2018

Recommended Reading Name Change

Filed under: Books and Papers,Education and Training,Newsletter — Yvonne LaRose @ 10:02 PM
Tags: , ,

A Wealth of Resources

A Wealth of Resources


When do we become bored with uninspired titles? It seems the author, who is supposed to be creative and engaging, lost the Creativity Muse and strove to muddle through without her. (So sad. Clio is a wonderful muse.)

How many of you yawn when you see the heading for each new installment of the reading list? I’ll admit it; I do. That’s why I embarked on a campaign to collect suggestions for a more catchy, engaging name for the publication. None were received.

Not to be daunted, there was fallback to the title used several years ago. Hearing no objections, nor alternative suggestions, the next installment of “Recommended Reading” intended for September-October will become

Worth a Read

The list is being aggregated on my Facebook editing services page In a Word – CCJP where recommendations for the next publication can be posted (without the need to register to do so).

Inclusion of a brief reason why the items is exceptional is requested. The name of the author or publisher (or both) can be extremely helpful.

The September-October issue of “Worth a Read” is in process and will be published within a few days. That doesn’t preclude recommending future items, whether fiction, poetry, essay, business, print, audio, visual, or just some good food for the brain.

Resources:

Useful Links:

August 21, 2018

Back in the Day

Filed under: Diversity,Hiring,Recruiting — Yvonne LaRose @ 5:36 PM
Tags: , , , , , ,
There's a mixture of generations working as one entity today

Previous roles are changed as life cycles evolve.

Today is Gerry Crispin’s birthday. He’s over 55 which is one of the thresholds for deeming a person as old, or ready to retire, or antiquated, or no longer useful. In other words, a target for age discrimination, whether passive or overt. Yet those who are 40 and older, even as old as in their late 80s, are still active in the work marketplace via many forms of employment and engagement. There is still a need for their knowledge, skills, and talent. Those attributes, those assets, provide a great deal of value to whatever enterprise chooses to include them in their mixture of talent.

I used this day to post a (as usual) teasing birthday wish to Gerry that read: “Have people started asking you about what you did back in the day? I just know you have a great response for that.”

For those of you who are curious about how “back in the day” is defined, Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English says it means “a long time ago, when you were much younger.”

Actually (never short on words or responses), Gerry did have a great public response, while also laughing at himself. It was:

lol. When the dinosaurs roamed the earth, recruiting was different but, as a candidate, you could physically apply to more companies then on a given day (Saturday before noon) with envelopes, paper resumes and stamps than you can in an entire week online. We could do a test…if there were any newspaper classifieds left but there isn’t so you’ll just have to take my word for it.

He raises some good discussion points. Undaunted, I had a response to his observations.

In the days of classified ads, all people were paid a minimum, livable wage. Thus, they were able to afford the cost of paper, copies, envelopes, stamps, transportation costs. But then, mailboxes were on every other street corner or the postal worker picked up the outgoing letters while delivering the new.

In those days, also, there wasn’t as much research required (or at least invested in) finding a job.

Now, in this digital age, there is less volume in terms of sent resumes because there’s more need for research. The challenges of making online applications can be time consuming if the employer doesn’t have a good webmaster.

Additionally, people are so busy working two, and up to five, jobs (as well as gigs) that they simply don’t have the time to do as many applications as back in the ’60s.

Then there are the discouragement and disillusion factors.

Gen Xers and Millennials (and even some who are older) have no qualms about expressing their belief that gray hair is an indication of being old, retired, and no longer active in the workforce. They will politely inquire about what it was like “back in the day” while forgetting that there are many who have gray hair and hold very responsible positions in businesses, while sitting on boards of directors, practicing from the bench (Associate Justice Kennedy), and being very involved in their consulting and training professions.

These gray- and white-haired stoics are not out in the pasture. An elite number have managed to stay afloat in the relevant and needed arena and are proving their worth in gold. And there are those who have been worn down to the rim and taken out of the game, many times not by choice.

Applying for work “back in the day” was more reasonable in many ways. No longer is it possible to simply take the “Help Wanted” sign out of the window and hand it to the owner while saying, “I’d like to apply for the job,” and get considered (even hired) on the spot. Job search was supposed to get better because of technological advances and the reach of cyber presence which also reduced the cost associated with conducting a search and vying for the gold ring along with that younger group.

There’s a vast amount of value in these vintage competitors. The training and preparation during their early days of school was different, more sound. There wasn’t a mass flocking to garner a degree, or even an advanced degree. There was substance being taught and concepts demonstrated in classroom discussion. There was actual experience gained through internships and volunteer work that didn’t detract from earning a meaningful living wage. Wage earning and work experience happened through various channels. For most, that experience and education was recognized and rewarded. But that was back in the day.

References:

Resources:

July 14, 2018

Recommended Reading – July

Filed under: Books and Papers,Education and Training — Yvonne LaRose @ 10:48 PM
Tags: , , ,

A Wealth of Resources

A Wealth of Resources



It’s July. It’s Summer. Life is supposed to be lived at a slower pace so that we don’t get overheated and burned to a spent match. Hey. There’s too much to be aware of and consumed. But let’s find some of the really good nuggets to keep our minds fresh and focused on the better side of the issues – and help us be wary of omens and trends.

With all that being said, Here’s the list of reading morsels recommended and found in various environs.

The Los Angeles Public Library offers a place where job seekers can access tools to aid in their career transitions. These tools are essentially universal (not limited to Los Angeles nor to California) so feel free to learn about and start using them (ahem, in addition to staying up to date with the knowledge available on Career Coach Corner

Offered by Ron from Starbucks Reserve (July 3) are

NACD Directorship Magazine offers Tools for Being an Effective Director download

HR pros Franny Oxford and Jessica DeFeo have formed a White women’s discussion group that has a recommended reading list you’ll want to have under your belt (no matter what your ethnicity). Too extensive to enumerate each title, here’s the post that provides the list.

In conjunction with the leaning toward affirmative action items, be certain you get your hands on Flora Davis’ Moving the Mountain either to read it or re-read it.

Pinterest offers some especially interesting and useful items related to the subject of Strategic Planning.

Many of us are aware that 82-year-old Associate Justice Kennedy retired two weeks ago. He is far from over the hill and he is definitely not useless. But for those who are threatened with being put into a persistent vegetative state, consider reading the study Can Volunteering Fight Dementia?

The Christian Science Monitor provided an interesting investigation of the issues confronting the Supreme Court on the matters of travel and Executive privilege in their article “As Supreme Court hears travel ban, questions of presidential authority also on docket.”

Resources:

June 6, 2018

Recommended Reading – May

A Wealth of Resources

A Wealth of Resources

Yes, this is supposed to be the May-June Recommended Reading. Would you believe I was held hostage by a savage group of recruiters? How about a mob of HR pros? Oh well, can’t say I didn’t try to come up with an excuse.

Nevertheless, the contributions were sparse but very good. This revival is so new that not many are aware of where or how to submit recommendations nor what the criteria for submissions is.

What to Submit

Submissions can be anything you believe is worthwhile reading, print, digital, or audio. It can be a white paper, journal article, a blog post or article. It can be fiction or non-fiction, and any genre in that space. Humor is good to balance out enlightenment. Even sports and recreation is worth inclusion.

When to Submit

The cutoff date for the bi-monthly post is the 25th of the month. (Shame faced: This post was supposed to be published at the end of May.)

Where to Submit

The best place to lodge a submission is to post the title, a brief summary, and link in the “Books & Publications” folder at Entrances Bulletins. In order to post in the Bulletins, it’s necessary to register with the site. There’s no fee unless you want more advanced features and search capabilities. The registration will also allow you to respond, comment, or share information of your own that’s either a bulletin board item or a conversation starter. Please post your recommendations to the thread for the next issue.

If that’s a pain in the neck, you can also email your recommendation to me. Please include the information requested – title, summary, link. Include in the Subject Line: “Recommended Reading – [Month]”.

May – June Reading Suggestions

Now that the preamble is done, let’s get into what showed up on the reading radar. In no particular order nor grouping, here’s what came across The Desk:

  • Doug Shaw recommended The Descent of Man by Grayson Perry as well as The Will to Change by bell hooks.
  • Nikki Dee wondered where to find some titles and resources re 1820s – 1850s regarding the English working poor. She received over 30 recommendations.
  • Annie Petersen shared an inspiring quote from Wouldn’t Take Nothing For My Journey Now by Maya Angelou. The excerpt says,

    Each one of us has the right and the responsibility to assess the roads which lie ahead, and those over which we have traveled, and if the future road looms ominous or unpromising, and the roads back uninviting, then we need to gather our resolve and, carrying only the necessary baggage, step off that road into another direction. If the new choice is also unpalatable, without embarrassment, we must be ready to change that as well.

    Is there a portion of this title that inspires you?

  • Susanne Dunlap questioned her writing styles for young adult audiences. Sample one of her 4+ star titles, In the Shadow of the Lamp or try Emilie’s Voice.
  • Easily with which many can relate in light of our current domestic affairs, Marcia Fine tells the story of life during turmoil via Hidden Ones: A Life of Memories. It won its seventh award from Jewish Arts & Culture.
  • Just where do you think the story of life is evolving in Maria Gibb’s shares a snippet from Sins of the Father: Children from the Streets Book 2 . The interesting thing about this stolen glance into the story is that the reader is made acutely aware of the peril about our protagonist yet the excerpt is poignant. Is this in Allepo, somewhere in Nicaragua, or one of our domestic neighborhoods?
  • Aside from the fact that she is the author, it was obvious what motivated Suzi Stembridge to share her enthusiasm for The Scorpion’s Last Tale. The thoughts that went through my mind after considering her words related to the work that went into creating those captivating and complicated stories. How much attention to detail and research went into the work so that the reader didn’t feel bogged down by the details but driven to continue reading in order to learn more and discover what was coming to the end while yearning for more of the tale.

    Likewise, it would be interesting to learn how others feel about writing for business and how a report can be turned into a captivating story for the sake of the stakeholders. The two forms of communication are very parallel.

  • Being a researcher for an author resulted in a fan who wrote a wonderful review. That’s the difficulty with learning new things and getting into the undercover story. You get hooked! Just look what happened to poor Jacqueline Reiter who said, “I finished Lynn Bryant’s An Unwilling Alliance this morning, and can’t really do full justice to it in a review, but it’s a book I wholeheartedly recommend (and not just because helping with some of the author’s research questions brought me a valuable new friendship).”
  • And just for the sake of fun, consider an award-winning time travel, Summer of Love by Lisa Mason seems to be one candidate.

Business and Nonfiction

It seems a good time to compare and contrast conditions prior to the current administration to now. Especially significant are the changes in attitudes toward opioids and the impact previously illicit drugs have on the workplace. To the headache of managers and HR professionals is means of reducing workers comp claims as well as better methods of screening for responsible hiring.

To see the other items curated in the folder, go to Reading Recommendations-May ’18.

Remember to submit your own recommendations for the next publication by simply clicking “Reply”, inserting the item along with a URL, and then click “Post”.

Resources:

Additional Resources:

April 28, 2018

Vocabulary Builder: Cogent and Lucid

Filed under: Vocabulary Builder — Yvonne LaRose @ 11:08 PM
Tags: , , , ,
Going to the source

Going to the source

Yes, it’s back, the Vocabulary Builder feature. The best I can tell you at this time is that it will be a monthly feature. It will consist of words, phrases, evolving concepts, and all that “stuff” that sounds really great but few are aware of what it really means – or they’ve forgotten.

This month starts with two words. They seem relevant because of the way our social atmosphere is starting to go.

The first word is “cogent.”

Dictionary.com tells us it’s an adjective. Great site that it is, it even provides various iterations in the form of adverbs as well as adjectives. It has two definitions, which essentially convey the same idea, being:

  1. convincing or believable by virtue of forcible, clear, or incisive presentation; telling.
  2. to the point; relevant; pertinent.

We strive to make cogent (clear and understandable) presentations at our department meetings. We want the client sales presentation to be relevant to their needs so that they will be more inclined to purchase our product instead of that produced by the competition. The interview was so cogent that it convinced the Hiring Committee to go with Candidate A instead of Candidates B or C.

Clear and convincing is what we’re attempting to communicate by using the word “cogent.”

Now what about this word, “lucid?” How did that get hauled into this conversation? (Would you believe My Muse forced me to include it?)

It’s another adjective (a word that describes the subject of the sentence). Again, Dictionary.com is my point of reference. They define the word as meaning:

  1. easily understood; completely intelligible or comprehensible: a lucid explanation.
  2. characterized by clear perception or understanding; rational or sane: a lucid moment in his madness.
  3. shining or bright.
  4. clear; pellucid; transparent.

Well. Although my consciousness demanded that both words be included in this re-launch, it appears there was more purposefulness to this than mere whim.

Helpful Resources:

April 13, 2018

Over 50 and Counting

Filed under: Affirmative Action,Diversity,Hiring,Recruiting — Yvonne LaRose @ 1:26 PM
Tags: , , ,
Experience-based Knowledge

Experience-based Qualification

One of the things I’m an advocate about is inclusive employment for those over 50. They bring to the table a wealth of experience and knowledge that can be crossed over to other matters. It’s because of the awareness.

These are people who, actuarially speaking, have a lot more and a lot longer to making the social and business milieu better and we should avail ourselves of those benefits rather than shove them into a space and make them vegetate. Practice keeps abilities sharp and honed. Think of tools that rust and deteriorate from lack of use and maintenance.

Mental and physical practice are also tools that deserve to be kept sharp. Like a well-seasoned cooking vessel, they get better with time and continued use. Here’s evidence of one such person – who also realized there was “another door” that could be opened.

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March 30, 2018

Recommended Reading – March 2018

Filed under: Books and Papers,Education and Training — Yvonne LaRose @ 8:15 PM
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A Wealth of Resources

A Wealth of Resources

There’s no two ways about it. I love books. They hold information. They tell stories. They provide Life lessons in various ways. They entertain. They bring comfort. They provide distraction from the tedious two-hour (or more) commute.

These days, they can be consumed in a whole array of media. There’s the traditional hard back, succeeded and supplemented with the paperback. Then came audio books for those who are visually impaired or like to read on the go. And now we have digital books that can be read on any type of mobile device. In fact, because of mobile devices, we can now have a vast library contained in the compact dimensions of a cell phone or tablet.

During my law school days, I commuted for an hour to get to school on the BART. During those rides, I challenged myself to read The New Yorker from cover to cover. Trying to get in last minute studying on the BART just wasn’t realistic, although I encountered a classmate who appeared to be successful at doing so.

When the hours away from BART were part of my life, there was the need to read and understand the text and case books. That led to an intensified addiction to reading. It didn’t matter what the content was, just so there was content to read. When classes weren’t in session, I busied myself with visiting the local library to borrow hard bound or paperback books along with several audiotapes to keep me satisfied while commuting on the bus or just walking from one destination to another. And then there was the filler reading done while doing housework or gardening.

Yes, I was addicted to books. I literally read about ten books per week. In fact, it got to the point that I began to fret that I would borrow nearly all of the adult reading content from the library and would be left with nothing more than the children’s section.

Those were wonderful days. I miss them – a lot. So AARP’s newsletter arrived a few days ago. The header was like pheromones to my eyes. “12 of the Best New Books for Spring” was what it promised to discuss and list. Although not on my business reading list, all of the titles are tempting in some way. With that statement, the practice of sharing book recommendations is being revived.

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