The Desk

September 11, 2017

Getting in the Temp Agency Door

The New Workforce

The New Workforce

At one point in time, getting formal temporary work was simply a matter of finding an agency. Well, actually, a little more than that. It was necessary to actually go in and fill out an employment application so that you could become a registered candidate. Then there were screening tests followed by an interview with the agency recruiter. Finally, you were asked about your availability and walked out with (1) a couple of time sheets in order to keep track of the hours you worked for (2) the job you were going to start doing the next business day.

In the Last Century

No, it wasn’t necessary to make an appointment. Having a resume was a nice thing to have. It showed a modicum of professionalism but more importantly, it showed you were prepared to work and show your work history.

Things changed a bit, but not drastically. The industry had little bearing on the protocol. It didn’t matter if it was office, labor, construction, nursing, or care giving. The routine was still the same. Labor agencies were even less formal. Simply go in, register, if the drop-in was not for the first time, simply put your name on the sign-in sheet, then sit and wait to be called for the next job.

Client Priority Changes

Some clients strove to streamline and formalize their operations. Their usual mode was to use their informal registration of applying to work via referral or emailing a resume and cover letter. They contacted their database of past workers to learn whether they were available for the next regular project and then did an new orientation. There was outreach for new workers who were sought by small advertisements and solicited referrals. But some decided to remove the paperwork and management from their workload. They turned to temp agencies to handle the administrative side of the employment issues. So the cadre of workers were required to register with the contracted agency during a registration period. The rest of the steps were the same.

New Game Plan

Sometime between 2008 and May 2017, the manner of working with an agency (from the worker’s side of the picture) changed. No more drop in, complete the application, go through testing, and walk out with a time sheet. Instead, applicants are now discouraged from even going into the agency office.

Instead, the applicant goes to the agency’s website and completes an application that’s accompanied by the applicant’s uploaded resume. In July, Joe Cummings, CEO, President, and owner of Royal Staffing, posted to LinkedIn by encouraging those who were seeking work to do so through his agency. The campaign was very similar to a current one that says, “Looking for a job? If so, we’re looking for you. Make your life easier and visit http://www.royalstaffing.com Look at the great opportunities we have waiting for you or someone you know.” What a great opportunity to find out how to be found. So I asked him to explain the new intake process used for registering temporary candidates.

“What we have our candidates do is fill out the online application. We reach out to each and every one of them once the applications received… If the applying candidate has the skills and a good work history for our niche market, we schedule an appointment for them to come in and interview. Prior to them coming in we do send them the assessment tests online and they complete them at home before they come into the office.”

This is now the protocol used by all agencies. Joe added some cautionary advice here. “[T]he job seeker is also responsible for following up on his or her application submittals to potential employers. The old adage still is very much alive today, the squeaky wheel gets the grease.”

But, What About?

There are still unanswered questions. This also begs the question of how the application / resume needs to be constructed in order to get temporary work – not gig work, just the fill-in stuff that used to be “easy-peasy”, walk in, take a test and complete forms, walk out with a time sheet and an assignment for the next day (and a paycheck the next week!).

Since there was no response by the end of June, I turned to the American Staffing Association to seek information. I explained my association and standing with the organization and asked for clarification about the change in protocol for registering with an agency. The burning questions were, “When did this practice begin and what is the reasoning for it?” Well, there’s been no response.

Digital and Modernization

Perhaps the reason for the change has to do with cost containment as well as the fact that we now do so much in a digital format. As each year since September 11, 2001 has passed, the need for security increases. Perhaps this manner of applying for work via the Internet has a small amount of attention to security issues. There is less need for office space and equipment so overhead is also reduced. Does that in turn mean that the contract workers can enjoy a small pay increase? It’s hard to say.

In the past, workers would choose an agency that was geographically easy to reach. At the end of the week, they could leave the work site and go directly to the agency office to drop off the verified time sheet. That also meant the previous week’s check could be held for them (not mailed) so they could personally receive it and handle it in whatever manner was necessary for their needs. Are checks now done via direct deposit? Security, as mentioned before, is growing to more than just physical site issues. Cybersecurity is now an important business concern. So perhaps that modicum of pay increase because of reduced overhead got absorbed by the expense of shoring up the vulnerabilities from the different weak spots. More open issues with no explanations.

The Same but Different

What remains is applying to work for more than a quick project now requires greater amount of formality. Yes, people do take vacations, go into hospital or take a leave of absence. Some employers manage the contingency by hiring one or two extra staff who have flexible skills. (That can become expensive over the long run.) And contingency work is still a great way to try out the talent before extending an offer of employment (also known as “temp to hire”) to get a 360, in-house evaluation of the talent. If the situation isn’t a good match, at least the “supply chain” of work continued without the usual interviewing / screening / onboarding interruptions created by traditional hiring methods.

And perhaps this is why the gig economy is not only growing but thriving today.

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May 4, 2016

Interests and Hobbies for Distinction

Filed under: Hiring,Job Search,Recruiting — Yvonne LaRose @ 3:38 PM
Tags: , , , , ,

An article recently came to my attention. The recommendations were dubious. Then an opportunity to share the knowledge with a group of recruiters arose. The group shared my reservations. The recommendation was to include one’s interests and hobbies on the resume and profile in order to distinguish special skills and stand out among the competition. The article proposed that the interests and hobbies would indicate particular strengths and abilities that can be used as indicia of success in the job that needs to be filled. dreamstimefree_14073429

The group of recruiters voiced opinions on the matter:

  • “I don’t normally pay attention to that section.”
  • It doesn’t really have any relevance to the job that’s on my desk
  • “I don’t use it.”

Job seekers are looking for whatever they can use to set themselves apart in a positive way. No doubt they will read that same article and believe that the advice applies to all job searches of whatever type and all manner of positions. After a lot of research in order to re-locate the correct article, one rose to the surface that made some distinguishing points about using hobbies and interests. They are helpful when the position is in a more esoteric area that requires unique skills that indicate traits such as perseverance, attention to detail, impervious to high levels of stress.

But what about the company that needs to fill a vacancy for a position in a special needs school? The person who knows and is able to use sign language may list that as a language skill and hobby in light of the fact that they do volunteer work at the John Tracy Clinic.

When we speak of job search, there’s an automatic default to ideas about jobs in the office. However, there are many types of jobs in different industries. A person could have a strong interest in health and medicine but they don’t want to be involved in working on people. There are also animals that require similar services. What about forestry as an option. Or that same person simply doesn’t want to be involved in health services but has a strong interest and keen skills in computers and programming. Perhaps their path to success is in the health sciences arena at a hospital or health facility.

So the candidate loves DIY projects. Could that mean they’re good a analysis, have strong concentration and focus skills, and are good at interpreting diagrams? Maybe there’s a niche for them in some form of construction or machine work.

The world of work is becoming increasingly complicated in regard to qualifying for a position and simply getting in the door. Occupations that you wouldn’t think of as requiring a resume now use that tool as part of the entry point. Do hobbies and extracurricular activities have a place and purpose on the resume or application? At times, they do. But they need to be used strategically if they are used at all. Sometimes they can become the bullet that shot the high school cheerleader who is applying for a mid-level management position in the foot. She’s remembered decades after leaving her application but not for the reasons she intended.

Resources:

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January 2, 2016

Exposure and Expertise

Businessman giving an used book to another businessman, learning to survive

Businessman giving a used book to another businessman, learning to survive

There’s a constant search for the best qualified candidate to be added to your workforce. They come to the table with all the education that’s required by the job description. They have the right amount of experience performing the tasks that need to be done. They are aware of the terminology and use it in appropriate context. They are wonderful when it comes to timely execution and speed. Why do they have all of these gifts? Where can you find more of them?

No doubt some of these skills were gained in the classes they took. Still others were developed with exposure to various technologies. Still other things were learned through conversations and reading all manner of trade and recreational content.

How useful all of this knowledge proves to be depends on its source and the amount and type of education that accompanied it. If it was merely parroting something without any appreciation of what the expression means or its history, not to mention the why of its use, then it’s simply doing because you were told to do so when x, y, or z occurred.

You can break a contract but taken literally, it’s difficult to see how a piece of paper can be broken. How many who don’t have exposure to that term understand that violating the terms of the agreement can result in losing the benefits of the association? We can talk about algorithms. That’s a fine and fancy name for having different bases of measuring things that are already in daily use. We count denominations of money using a base of 10. However, we measure distances, space, and time with a base of 12. All of those are algorithms. Does the neophyte realize this? Perhaps not. They’re simply intimidated by this new word and concept that’s been put before them with no explanation.

Taking a skills test can be similar to taking a classroom evaluation of the last section that was taught. However, screening and selection tests such as the LSAT or the SAT are an entirely different thing. If the applicant has never experienced an evaluation process of that type, it shouldn’t be expected that they will perform well on literally their first exposure – unless, of course, there’s some form of genius lurking in those brain cells.

Scalia recently opined that Blacks should not be put into the better educational institutions because they have poor learning skills. That might be true were it not for the fact that educating Blacks has historically been an after thought (if that much). Like women, they were to be kept uneducated in order to have better control over the population and keep them in a state of being disenfranchised. And even in that ethnicity, plus the combinations that created racial and ethnic Creoles, there have been those who found patrons who saw the benefits of providing quality education to them. In the alternative, the population found ways to gain even the rudimentary gems of education in order to propel them into something more.

Education is a prized aspired to by all races and ethnicities. Each family sees it as the tool that will bring fulfillment of the promise of a better life and empowerment. But that promise cannot be realized if the mentoring and educating to create the employable candidate is not provided.

So develop your employee education programs to your advantage. Also develop mentoring programs with an eye toward reducing apathy while increasing engagement and productivity. The exposure to the concepts and terminology will provide you with more than just the ideal candidate for the next step on the ladder.

Resources:

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June 21, 2015

Dispelling Myths: Timeless Lessons

What was the day like on June 20, 1926 in Beggs, Louisiana? Out of curiosity, let us look at a remodeled farm house from that period that’s now standing in present day standards. Simply switch out the dish washer for a stand with a place for a tub, a wood burning stove, and humble plaster on the walls, and you’ve pretty much transported yourself into the time and place. Let us compare and contrast that the updated appearance to that of the period. Consider The Creole Cottage. Aside from the appliances and an abundance of windows, the appointments are not drastically different.

It was the height of the Great Depression and the Summer. By necessity, industry was predominantly agrarian, the house filling with children. There were many hands contributing to the burgeoning amount of work to be done. We’ve gone through several economic revolutions in that time but some things are just as timeless as the cottage.

There were many lessons to be learned and passed on to the next generation. Lessons with regard to business matters and roles of the individual sexes. There were many teachers in many disciplines. But discipline and etiquette were primary for all, no matter what age or race. Abiding to strict rules of protocol and respect was expected of everyone toward their fellow humans. Pre-pubescents did not speak to any adult as though the adult was an inferior, no matter what the race. Likewise, children did not dismiss adults from their presence because the child was through talking to the adult.

Being articulate and well spoken is another trait of the Louisianan. Those skills represent one’s station as well as the status of the family. Expect the candidate from Louisiana to take humble pride in their speaking skills. In fact, don’t be surprised if there’s astonishment at a compliment paid to their articulateness. It’s a matter that’s taken for granted.

Even before there were human resource departments in urban areas and before the establishment of the Social Security system, a form of collective benefits fund in the form of a Creole Social Club was established in order to provide for emergencies. These are resourceful people who do not rely on handouts for survival. It is insulting to characterize them in any inferior way.

Animal husbandry was just part of the daily grind. So, also, was weights and measures and negotiating a fair price. Sundays were spent listening to Grandfather preach. Weekdays were constant exercises of how to speak to others with diplomacy, in a well modulated voice, using reason as the higher bargaining skill in order to negotiate the sought-after goal.

It was Great Depression America. That meant knowing how to be self sufficient. But it also meant having the wisdom to gain favor with all neighbors in case of need or emergency. Which takes us back to communication and persuasion skills. Speak; don’t speak. It takes a discerning mind to know when words are necessary in order to accomplish something and what priority the “something” has with regard to advocating for it.

There were social skills to learn. One realized that no matter who you were, you were an example of your family. That meant being circumspect in all manner of things. To bring shame upon yourself was to bring shame on not only your family but also your neighbors, your community. So being polite, knowing the rules of etiquette, and knowing your place were supremely important for the community to heave together and survive.

Evaluate, evaluate, evaluate. Before making judgments about anything, evaluate as much of the situation as possible. Gather all the facts. Judge the person by their acts and deeds and use a point system in order to rank whether they have earned being in your company or if they are begging for exclusion. If the words don’t match the actions, if they don’t have the right number of points, they need to be removed from consideration. Maybe they can redeem theirself sometime in the future. But there are many things that need to be accomplished. Better to not waste time and energy on one who will be a detraction. So keep them on the fringes (maybe) for future consideration and allow them to prove they are worthy of earning trust and inclusion for building resources and skills.

Things have changed since 1926. It’s called modernization and progress. But some things are constant. Before we fall on trusting the generalizations about classes of people, we need to realize that the character of a person and the foundations upon which they were raised are as ingrained in them as their DNA. Take them out of the place of origin and they will resort to the practices that made them who they are. Many are what we desire: circumspect, hard working, discerning, reliable.

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November 8, 2014

Telltale Signs: Company Profile

A young man stood on the bus stop wearing a navy blue suit. He held a notebook-sized portfolio. His attire was impeccable. I ventured a guess and decided to test it.

“So how did the interview go?”

“Okay. But I’m not sure about them.”

“Just okay? Do you think you’ll accept the position?”

The more he spoke, the more I noticed excellent articulation and vocabulary. There were some physical features that were not very attractive. However, they were quickly dismissed as he continued his discussion of the interview and his analysis of the company and how he would fit into the organization, if he chose to. It was a restaurant and he was to be the host.

He talked about the glowing interview and the very attractive offer that was made. He expressed uncertainty about the acceptance and I questioned him, again.

“I’m not sure about them. There’s a lot of talk but they make me nervous. They’re cutting too many corners.”

Just as important to the recruiter is not only the candidate’s appearance on paper and in person but also how the client looks. And just as the candidate needs to present a good appearance and profile, so does the client. Care needs to be devoted to the quality that goes into the product in addition to the running of the company. Selection of those who appreciate those imperatives and can deliver in a professional, ethical manner is what needs to be reached.

The recruiter is looking for the best match for both sides. Very important to their livelihood is the client who has desirable attributes. A savvy executive management candidate, as well as the recruiter, will consider things such as amount of time in business, success record, office atmosphere, profit and loss statement, vision, planning, industry ranking and reputation, management, turnover rate, timely payment of debts and debt management, to mention just a few factors.

Cutting corners shows, no matter what the corners. When recruiting for the best, it’s important to put forth the best image possible. In the long run, you’ll attract the best and most loyal customers as well as the best candidates who will serve them to keep your business alive and profitable.

What is your interviewing style saying about your company?

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Republished from Career and Executive Recruiting Advice (October 31, 2002)
Republished from Suite101.com (June 5, 2001)

November 2, 2014

Do the Research

Entrances is a 360 networking forum on LinkedIn. It’s for an exchange of information and for networking with others in order to develop new connections and awareness of new opportunities. The purpose is to gain better insights about another part of the employment sector other than your own space so that better choices are made based in feedback from the other players. One goal is developing relationships that can lead to referrals.

Entrances-Faces of the workplace

Entrances – Making sound choices based on informed networking

While it isn’t a forum for political speech, there are a series of videos running that are produced by ColorofChange.org based on their #IfTheySpeakForMe theme . They show by various examples of what ensues if others make choices for you because you didn’t do your research; instead, you were passive and took whatever you got. In this weekend before midterm elections, the videos emphasize the importance of doing good research before embarking on an endeavor or entering into relationships.

With those compelling ColorofChange messages are scenarios of hair care dictated by a stranger and being hijacked in a taxi. Those are similar to taking on employment with a client or employer you haven’t researched.

I encourage you to do the research this weekend that will help you make the right choice for you in the voting booth. Remember to vote. Exercise your rights.

Who Is This

That being said, remember to do some research, ask meaningful questions, about where your livelihood is or will be. Find out who the potential employer is. Determine whether the recruiter is the right one for you. What does the recruiter want in terms of a “qualified candidate” and how can the resume writer or the career coach help you them reach your goals. Maybe they simply are not the right fit. Maybe their philosophies are (and never will be) in consonance with your own ethics or beliefs in good practices. Consider the video wherein the hairstyle of several women is determined by a total stranger who contravenes the women’s wishes and relationship with their hairdresser.

We’ve talked about hair in Entrances from the perspective of what is accepted by the other side of the employment desk. It was intended to look at the various styles, colors, whether it constituted good grooming, and whether hairstyle is a valid hiring criteria. A few interesting views were expressed.

Making Impressions

Has someone impressed you with their words? What did they do to make that impression? How reliable are they? Would you be willing to refer them to something that may be a good match for what they have to offer?

Bottom Line

Which is the more important emphasis? Know who the employer is. Know their product or service before going on the interview or taking them on as a client. Recruiters are held liable for the misdeeds of their clients. It is a recruiter’s duty to guide a client along the more ethical path if they are erring in their decisions or execution of their business practices. But it’s imperative to know all of these things before getting involved or else having a delicate but compelling reason for taking a different, better path to open the right door and make better entrances.

July 22, 2014

EEOC Announces Expansion of “Disabled”

Today I’m working on clearing some content off of my desk so that I can return to better productivity. Today I’m going to share with you a bit of the processes (but not all of them!) I go through to come up with some of the answers that are shared with my readers.

This particular topic isn’t quite as old as the research from the Meet the Press April 27 assertions about Asian women being the lowest paid of the minorities. And it doesn’t quite match the things I found about how recruiters review profiles on LinkedIn. Oh, there are quite a few things that have been crushing The Desk. But the matter of the expansion of the definition of “disabled” needs to be better organized and in a folder of its own.

It was late February or early March when I read an email that brought awareness of the fact that the EEOC had expanded the definition of “disabled” so that it now includes non-visible disabilities. The case related to Williams v. Toyota Motor Mfg. where a production line worker developed carpel tunnel syndrome and was not provided with sufficient accommodations for her disability. You’d think a simple thing like muscle strain would not give rise to such a momentous change in the law. But another phenomenon that was happening was people with diabetes or having been diagnosed with breast cancer were also suing their employers for disabling conditions that kicked them out of the employment arena.

12" wire cart accessibility device

A shopping cart or accessibility device?

I took this change in law to the Accessibility Advisory Committee’s March (or was it April) meeting because the Committee focuses on accessibility issues for seniors and the disabled. They needed to know about this change in definition. Also significant to the group’s awareness was the fact that I was the one who brought to their attention the matter of non-visible disabilities at the August 2013 meeting. The Committee, therefore, in its efforts to effectively serve its constituents was leading other organizations with regard to the matter. And the Committee could be said to be on the cutting edge of disability awareness and accommodation regulations and ways to address how they provide accommodations.

Unfortunately, that Public Comment was omitted from the meeting minutes in spite of the fact that several who were present asked for the information to be repeated while they feverishly copied the name of the case into their notes. It was necessary to find that email message again or at least the additional Web content that backed it up so that the accuracy of the shared information could be assured. And that’s when The Desk started growing its slush pile.

My efforts to commute on public transportation were meeting with increasing denials. My efforts to effect change and improvement through membership on the Committee were being met with increasing resistance and suspicion. I was finding I was spinning my wheels while being cut out of conversations and opportunities to provide input on driver training modifications. Worse yet, it began to appear that the presentation I’d done regarding non-visible disabilities was going to become (or had already become) yet another instance of watching my work be credited to someone else’s efforts while I sat on the sidelines with a reputation as a troublemaker but no attribution to the originator of the content. That isn’t what consulting is about.

  • Out of frustration, I took a new step by bringing my concerns to the Metro Board. But first, I wanted in my hand an official definition of a non-visible disability. I found What is an Invisible Disability?
  • It’s one thing to go before a body with a lot of platitudes and shrieks about “do something”. But a governing body has little room for action when it has few facts on which to operate. If I were on that body, I would want to know the size of the population that’s being affected. In answer to that, I researched on the string “how many suffer from non-visible disabilities

It isn’t clear whether Metro will make modifications to their operator training so that the drivers are much more sensitive to the fact that there is a class of commuter that is disabled but the evidence of their limitations is not obvious. They should not be accused of being shiftless homeless people. They should not be denied transportation. They should not be forced to over-exert themselves when simple deployment of a ramp (that is supposed to make boarding easier) could be done. They need to be cognizant that the person may have just exited their doctor’s office and are operating on instructions to limit certain activities. They may be suffering from an ailment that causes impairment to their balance.

Pass-ups happen to more than individuals using wheelchairs. Sometimes they happen because the person wasn’t paying attention; the bus approached and they didn’t collect their self fast enough so that the operator could stay on schedule. Those with sleep apnea may doze off without any fault on their part. Or just the fatigue of having to ride the bus all day to accomplish a paltry number of things (one or two) has worn the individual into an ennui. Unfortunately, the Chair of the Committee doesn’t seem to appreciate these conditions.

Furthermore, commuters should be treated with respect. Insulting words and insinuations are simply not appropriate and will cause your customer base to be motivated to find an alternative.

There you see some of it. These are just part of the process of collecting the information that falls on The Desk that needs to be reported to you, especially as today’s content relates to the volumes about the expansion of “disability” as it relates to non-visible disabilities.

Sponsored Link:

Sociopolitical Aspects of Disabilities: The Social Perspectives and Political History of Disabilities and Rehabilitation in the United States

 

February 25, 2014

Seniors Employer Finder

One feature of many job boards is to help a candidate search for the right types of jobs and to help them focus on jobs available in their area. Not many of them offer a specialty feature such as employers who are actively seeking those over 50. For that matter, not any of the ones I’ve seen offer special features or highlight opportunities for those with disabilities. But I digress.

I have found what appears to be a great job board and search engine that targets the over 50 demographic. It came in the form of an AARP email that talked about finding a job with better benefits. Then the web page talked about job search for those over 50 and best employers for that age range. And then the Nirvana Moment. It provided a link to the Best Employers Job Search Tool. There’s also a list compiled by AARP in association with Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM) called the Best Employers for Workers Over 50 awards program. Since I found this resource in the Summer of last year, what I can do is send you to the 2013 Best Employers list.

It is “a biennial program that was started in 2001 and recognizes employers with exemplary practices for recruiting and retaining mature workers.” The award winner was How each employer was selected is worth a read. After learning that they submitted an application to be included in the list, the question that comes to mind is how many knew about this opportunity. And the next thing to ponder is (given that the usual response rate to surveys and calls to action is about 10%) how many actually participated in being considered. And yet another thing to think about is whether the list of candidates is growing in its existence and the extent or rate of the growth.

Some of the criteria for selection looks at whether the employer has “set outstanding examples through programs that help them retain, retrain, engage and recruit the older workers who will be increasingly crucial to their success and the success of the U.S. economy over the coming decade.” It’s so glad to know that seniors are valued for the long run. Another intersting criteria for making the list is innovative ways of attracting and retaining senior workers.

This is not some local yokel award. The search has expanded to include international companies. And they get into considering the more creative ways of not only attracting but also retaining these valued, seasoned workers. Many have the tendency to consider older workers not as viable for positions as the younger generations. It has been found that assumption is a myth that definitely needs to be dispelled.

It’s entirely possible to simply build a page of links. It’s much wiser to provide you with some of the more meaningful ones on this topic and allow you to explore in order to come up with some of your own ideas about how to show your appreciation of and keep your older workers.

Resources:

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The 2020 Workplace: How Innovative Companies Attract, Develop, and Keep Tomorrow’s Employees Today

 

March 28, 2013

Tipping the Success Scales

Some people seem to have all the luck. They toss their presentation materials (resume, cover letter, work samples, portfolio, profile statement and URL, and so on) into the social stream (not to be confused with the jet stream of all the others zooming past in order to gain attention) and get snatched up in short order. “Well just how did that happen?” some will pout. “I’m just as qualified; maybe even more so. And I definitely got my materials delivered before that Johnny-Come-Lately!” Maybe you did. In fact, the time stamp says you were a full two days ahead of your competitor yet they got the tap for coming in to do a face-to-face meeting. Drat!

Patrick McFadden writes the Indispensable Marketing blog and indirectly explains this phenomenon. He calls it using power words or words that enrich. Patrick provides 50 power words in his enrichment post and then tells a reader that the 50 is not the exhaustive representation. Good point, too, I might add. While the list is fantastic, it doesn’t include the word “open” as one example of what could be included. Some other synonyms not in his list are words such as “alluring”, “receptive”, and “ready” but that doesn’t prevent them from being just as effective when it comes to delivering consistent results.

Actually, Patrick’s words are intended for those who are marketing their business – whether a service or a product. His intent was not to provide advice for job seekers. When you stop to consider the process that’s occurring, however, it becomes obvious that the principles are essentially the same because what’s being marketed, in the case of job seekers, is a basket of talents and skills they possess. Even freelancers and consultants need to pay attention to these power words and integrate them into their daily vocabulary (to get into the habit of using the words; to get into the mindset of those adjectives).

A word of caution would serve all of us well at this juncture. Marketo is a partner of About.com’s Marketing Channel. Marketo is offering a free ebook called 10 Tips for Successful Email Campaigns. Once you have that download on your screen, you’ll discover Marketo discourages use of some of Patrick’s 50 because when used in email, they become spam magnets and will prevent your message from being delivered.

One word in particular is guaranteed to be counterproductive when seeking new opportunities and contracts – “free.” We’re not in the business of surviving off the land and being charitable to a fault. In the early days of The Net, tons (literally) and scads of stuff was free. We got really accustomed to that. But the IT bubble that burst back in 2000 taught us that exorbitant salaries countered with no price tag will eventually be the death of all things we like and admire. (I wonder if that works on weeds?) There’ll be a lot of people walking away with all that free advice and examples. You’ll be standing there watching the backs of those who received. They’ll be headed to the place where they can get the model made, the services delivered (on time), and getting paid for all that knowledge of yours that you so generously allowed them to convert to cash. And they’ll have paid someone else for the reaping of those benefits.

Don’t be too liberal with use the word “free.” Think “freely expand” or “generous benefits.” Do be free with use of the Indispensable Marketing words in your writing, in your networking, and in your normal vocabulary so that you convey the rich rewards of being associated with you.

December 7, 2012

Diversity Sites for the Picking

Filed under: Job Search,Networking,Recruiting — Yvonne LaRose @ 8:06 PM
Tags: , , , ,

Well, the other day the site had an accident. I caused it. There was a tweak this and a tweak that and a position this to a better place and a “how do I fix that” moment. Four hours into this project, something looked like it was precisely the answer to getting things fixed. I opened the menu, selected what should be eliminated, and then clicked “Delete.” All of the Community and Blogroll links disappeared. Oops.

Fortunately, they’re still on the backend of the site. But that does you readers little to no use. [Donchajestluvit when you make more work for yourself when your goal was to get things more organized, streamlined, and easier to manage?]

Today, I’m sharing with you the Career Opportunity links that used to be in the side bar. The great thing about the Opportunity links that were in this category is that they all relate to diversity in some way. Given that state of affairs (as well as the timing), a few additional sites are included in this summary. There’s no easy way to organize these. The list was alphabetical without regard to genre; so that order is maintained now.

  • Career Opportunities is the folder located at Entrances Bulletins. New opportunities from various sites are added there, sometimes on a daily basis. In fact, you can register to be a Basic/Free member and then post any opportunities you know of in that folder. Just make certain what you post isn’t some type of MLM or pyramid situation. You’ll notice that anything that’s been posted by the owner of the site has an AddThis button so that the post can be shared with a large number of other sites, including Twitter, LinkedIn, and FaceBook (to name a few). That button can be used liberally. In fact, you can contact the owner of the site and request the script so that the button can be added to your own signature.
  • ComputerJobs.com isn’t a diversity site but it definitely is one you should know about. It offers situations that span the needs of the computer industry. The last time I checked, it was thriving. It offers all types of jobs that are either full time or contract and related to computers.
  • Disaboom Jobs features jobs specifically amenable to people with some type of impairment. It’s vision friendly by virtue of the fact that it has larger type. The newly posted jobs and the featured jobs show the job title as well as the city and state. They also display when the job was posted with the site. (You have an idea of how much of a chance you stand in regard to timeliness of your applying for the situation.) It’s user friendly and easy to navigate. Employers as well as job searchers will find the tabs helpful.
  • Diversitree.com Jobs holds a wealth of jobs for a wealth of diversity areas. According to owner Patricia, “We recruit for all types of diversity; as it is defined differently for every person, based on experience,” and she enumerates gender, age, military service, ethnicity, differently-abled, multilingualism, religion, personal orientation, and many more.” It’s simple and straightforward in its presentation which makes it extremely easy to navigate. Those of you involved in recruiting, hiring, and onboarding, you’ll be especially attracted to the fact that guest bloggers are invited. You job seekers will appreciate the tools for researching companies.
  • Find Law Career Center is really difficult to find even with the correct URL. Once you’re in there, you’ll find an enormous amount of resources for both job seekers and recruiters. You looking for some special information? Here are some of the categories: Employer Information that includes Salary Charts (FindLaw Exclusive), Employer Directory, Recruiter Information, and the Legal Recruiter Directory, Legal Recruiter Jobs. You can also manage your career with these tools: Law Career Articles, Diversity Center, and the Cool Jobs Newsletter. You want more? Okay. How about Professional Development Center, Outplacement Center, and AttorneyJobs.com. It’s worth a visit for lawyers, paralegals, librarians, and recruiters. The trick is actually getting into the center.
  • Hirediversity has tons of tools for recruiting and job search. There’s obviously going to be a search tool. There are search articles to help with making the effort less a matter of hit or miss. I like the fact that they have a Diversity Events page that will help you to be at the right place at the right time to rub elbows, shake hands, and talk to the right people for better connections and referrals.
  • VetJobs sports a lot of features one wouldn’t expect from a typical job site. For example, there’s a section for spouses. Although labeled Alliances, this section provides descriptions and links to other job search sites for a great cast of ones career net.

Okay, now they’re restored – here. Visit the page frequently to find out more. Leave comments about your experiences with these sites and your recommendations. Also leave comments to recommend other diversity sites not included in this post. Please give the name of the site, its URL, and a brief description of it so that others can make use of it. (The next time there’s an update about job boards and sites, your recommendation will be included.) They’ll make it even more useful and it will become a vibrant resource instead of yet another list of websites.

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